One ocean. Episode 2, Footprints in the sand /

With never-before-seen HD footage, this four-part documentary series from The Nature of Things dives into the world's vast interconnected ocean ecosystem - telling the story from its turbulent birth to its threatened future.

Corporate Author: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation., National Geographic Channels International., Science Channel (Television network)
Other Authors: Suzuki, David T., 1936- (Narrator)
Language: English
Published: Toronto, Ontario : Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, [2010]
CBC Learning
Series: Nature of things (Television program)
Subjects:
Notes: LIBRARY ALSO HAS THIS TITLE AVAILABLE ON DVD.
Closed-captioned.
Online Access: Click Here to Access Streaming Video.Normandale users only. Must be on campus or have valid library card to view video
Format: Electronic Video Videotape Videorecording Electronic Resource URL Resource
Summary: With never-before-seen HD footage, this four-part documentary series from The Nature of Things dives into the world's vast interconnected ocean ecosystem - telling the story from its turbulent birth to its threatened future.
Today, two billion people live along or near a coast. By 2025, nearly all ocean shoreline will be inhabited and in use. Overfishing, pollution, over-population, and over-development of our coasts are having deadly consequences. The ocean that once seemed inexhaustible is buckling under the weight of our demands. Footprints in the Sand reveals the devastating impact of human activity on the ocean, focusing on the Mediterranean's contentious bluefin tuna fishery and the Gulf of Mexico's massive de-oxygenated dead zones. It also celebrates our successes with sustainable practices, like "no take" conservation projects managed by locals in Zanzibar, as well as the extraordinary turnaround in New Zealand's coral reefs. - Docuseek2 website.
"In our second episode ... we take measure of humanity's impact on the sea since we first settled along its coasts over 150,000 years ago. We travel to the Mediterranean Sea with local Spanish fishermen in search of the magnificent bluefin tuna, the most prized fish in the ocean. It's also one of the most overfished. As fishermen try to maintain their centuries-old method of fishing, conservation scientists are desperate to find hard evidence to support their side in the heated debate over quotas. Human activity through history ? first overfishing, then over-development of the world's coastlines, and the continuing pollution that we pour into the sea ? have had unexpected consequences. But ... marine protected areas can have a huge impact on an ecosystem's ability to recover. Zanzibar is a place where the people have always depended on fish for their survival. There, locals are finding ways to live in balance with the ocean by using more sustainable approaches to their harvests, and also by creating a sense of communal ownership and stewardship. In New Zealand, we discover that ocean areas which are now protected have experienced an extraordinary turn-around ? where once sea urchins had taken over and destroyed the reefs and kelp forests, top predators have returned and the stunning reef has been restored to its full glory."-- One Ocean series website.
Item Description: LIBRARY ALSO HAS THIS TITLE AVAILABLE ON DVD.
Closed-captioned.
Physical Description: 1 streaming video file (43 minutes, 47 seconds) : sound, color, digital.
Also issued as videodisc (DVD).
Playing Time: 00:43:47
Format: Mode of access: Internet.
System requirements: Microsoft Internet Explorer 8.0 or higher; Firefox 4.0 or higher; Flash or HTML5 player.
Production Credits: Director, Jacqueline Corkery ; producer, Tina Verma ; editor, Murray Green ; series producer, Caroline Underwood.